History of Art Graduate Department of Art

Edward Bacal

Modern/Contemporary

Email: edward.bacal@mail.utoronto.ca | Website: https://utoronto.academia.edu/EdwardBacal

Supervisor: John Paul Ricco

I write about modern and contemporary art and visual culture from North America, Latin America, and Europe, with especial interest in the theoretical and political implications of formal strategies. In writing about art, my hope is that the experience of art and the experience of writing can bring about different ways of thinking and being. In that respect, my research asks how the experience of art is equally aesthetic and ethical.

Areas of Academic Interest
  • Abstract and conceptual art from 1960 to present (especially minimalism and post-minimalism)
  • Continental philosophy and critical theory
  • Aesthetics and politics and ethics
  • Thanato-politics
  • Embodiment
Current Research
  • My dissertation is about Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Doris Salcedo, Teresa Margolles, and Santiago Sierra, who reuse the aesthetics of minimal art to address contemporary political crises. With their work, I consider how they use aesthetic abstraction to register the disappearance of bodies.
Education
  • MA History of Art, University College London, 2012
  • BA University of Toronto, 2011
Selected Publications
  • “Pervasive Death: Teresa Margolles and the Space of the Corpse.“ In Human Remains and Violence, forthcoming.

  • “Up, Down, Left, Right: Some Thoughts on the Inverse, Reverse, and Double.“ FrameWork 4/16 (2016). www.susanhobbs.com

  • “The Concrete and the Abstract: On Doris Salcedo, Teresa Margolles, and Santiago Sierra’s Precarious Bodies.“ Parallax 76 (2015).

  • “Capitalism and Contemporaneity: On Jeremy Deller’s The Battle of Orgreave.“ Kapsula (2014).

  • “Art Work: Santiago Sierra and Socio-Aesthetics of Production.“ Shift 6 (2013).

  • “Sharon Lockhart and Steve McQueen: Inside the Frame of Structural Film.“ CineAction 91.

Recent Awards
  • 2013 SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship

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