History of Art Graduate Department of Art

Meet Our Postdoctoral Fellows: Julia Lum

Friday, February 15, 2019

 Julia Lum

SSHRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow

 

I came to the University of Toronto after completing my PhD in art history at Yale University. Before that, I did a master’s degree in art history at Carleton University.

Many things attracted me to the University of Toronto: its faculty, its world-class library and museum collections and its opportunities for interdisciplinary engagement. I wanted to work with Mark Cheetham, whose scholarship on landscape, eco art and art theory advances urgent sets of issues that connect across periods and traditions.

My own research about the art of eighteenth and nineteenth century Britain, cross-cultural exchange and landscape art has shifted since I began postdoctoral research. My new project looks at the photographs and landscape views made by British and American surveyors who marked the 49th parallel North American border between Lake of the Woods and the Pacific Coast from 1857 to 1876.

The question of how Canada and the United States took shape, and what other kinds of knowledge and cultural practices were adopted or suppressed in the process of making the line, is something that I’m particularly poised to think about in Toronto. Not only are there photographs and papers at the Archives of Ontario, but the original reports, engravings and publications of the boundary survey are within easy reach at UofT’s magnificent Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library and at Robarts Library. No less important is the strong contingent of Toronto-based Indigenous and Settler artists and scholars whose practices are reframing how we think of nations and sovereignties.

My approach to this research question is enriched by attending workshops at interdisciplinary centres such as the Jackman Humanities Institute, and by seeking expertise in fields as diverse as cultural geography, environmental studies, anthropology and Indigenous education. I look forward to continuing to build relationships with the art history and visual studies faculty, graduate students and with scholars across campus.

Ariella Minden at the KHI

Friday, February 15, 2019

In September 2018 it was announced that one of our graduate students, Ariella Minden, received a Max-Planck Pre-Doctoral Fellowship at the Kunsthistorisches Institut (KHI) in Florence. We asked Ariella to reflect on her time at the KHI under the supervision of Prof. Alessandro Nova and what the next 18 months have in store for her as she continues this amazing fellowship.

As a second year PhD student in the Graduate Department of Art at the University of Toronto my desk looks exactly like what one might expect of someone who has just started to undertake a book-length study also known as my doctoral dissertation. There are books piled high, well above my head, notes scattered about with ‘brilliant ideas’ that turn into passing thoughts, and a to-do list or three written on post-it notes stuck to the frame of my computer screen. The slight difference, however, is the location of my desk, which is not in Toronto, but instead at the Kunsthitorisches Institut in Florence where I am a pre-doctoral fellow.

The Kunsthistorisches Institut (KHI) is a Max Planck Society institute for art historical research, which also houses one of the largest art libraries in Europe. Having just celebrated its 150th birthday, the KHI remains a vibrant intellectual centre with hundreds of scholars making use of its resources, a regular program of lectures and seminars, and a team of pre- and post-doctoral fellows divided between two departments who carry out their own research while also taking part in larger working groups led by the directors of each department.

“What is your role in this ecosystem?” I hear you ask. I am a member of Prof. Alessandro Nova’s department where I am writing my dissertation on visual culture in Bologna during the first quarter of the sixteenth century. My project examines the ways in which artists and scholars worked in concert to generate knowledge, a conceit facilitated by the presence of the University, the oldest in Europe. During my two-year fellowship at the KHI, I am expected to give regular research-in-progress papers both at departmental meetings as well as for my pre-and post-doctoral colleagues. I presented the initial results of my research last October, speaking about three illustrated anatomical treatises published in 1521, 1522, and 1523. Focusing on the texts’ woodcuts, I discussed these books as sites of collaboration and experimentation to better understand print culture in Renaissance Bologna. Complimentary to my own research, I am part of the working group “Rinascimento Conteso”- “The Contested Renaissance.” Within this framework I take part in site visits, reading groups, and seminars where the goal is to reconsider and challenge traditional narratives of the Italian Renaissance by offering new critical methodologies or reintroducing previously neglected corpora.

I cannot overstate how fortunate I am to be part of such an intellectually vibrant community. At the KHI itself, I am surrounded by colleagues and mentors who continue to be lively interlocutors as my dissertation begins to take shape. The weekly academic programming has exposed me to a range of topics with which I had little prior familiarity. Furthermore, living in Florence has allowed for me to be immersed in the works of art that I study and am passionate about. I have had the opportunity not only to explore the artistic collections of the city itself, but to travel to other cities throughout Italy, an experience that has enriched my perspectives on certain object. This has opened up new avenues in my current project and continues to create fertile grounds for work in the future. With such a rich start to my fellowship, I look forward to what the next 18 months have in store!

Exposé of my Digging Days

Monday, May 7, 2018

View from the Central Court as a storm rolled into Sissi (© EBSA; T. Thoennes)

My name is Tatiana Thoennes, a current fourth year student completing a History of Art Specialist and a Renaissance Studies Major. Last summer, from June 24th to August 4th, 2017, I interned outside of my concentrated area of study as a volunteer archaeologist on the Sissi Archaeological Project at Sissi, Crete; and had one of the best experiences of my life. Archaeological excavations have been underway in the Aegean since before 1900 when archaeologists such as Heinrich Schliemann and Sir Arthur Evans attempted to find evidentiary support for tales told by Homer and Greek mythology. Excavating has since evolved to be more than the unearthing of tales and are now more the attempt to discover all there is to know about proto-historical civilisations. Archaeologists at Sissi, Crete celebrated their tenth year of excavation this past summer; a summer I am proud to say I was able to take part in, a summer which fueled my love for archaeology.

The second object I found – a Lithic Tool (© EBSA; photo by M. Georgiadou)

The excavation is directed by Professor Jan Driessen from the Université catholique de Louvain under the auspices of the Belgian School at Athens and in collaboration with the Archaeological Service of East Crete (Ministry of Culture of Greece). This past season, there was an impressively large team consisting of 69 volunteers in addition to the permanent team and workmen. The Sissi Project consists of the archaeological site and the Apothiki. The Apothiki is located off-site and is where all samples and objects found on site are brought each day; cleaned, identified, dated and stored.

Each day on (and off) site was structured with a specific timeline to ensure productivity. Everyone was expected to be there and ready to work at 06:00. We would work until Kollatzo (breakfast provided by the excavation) at 10:30 which lasted for half an hour; after which we would work until 14:00. All bags containing samples and objects found during the day, as well as supervisor notes, had to be provided to Professor J. Driessen by 14:00 and no later. After excavation was done for the day, we would have a break and were provided lunch back at our respective dig hotels. For those that did not have to go to the Apothiki, the rest of the day was free. Those on the afternoon Apothiki rotation would rest until 16:00 and then would be driven to the Apothiki to clean pottery until 18:30, leaving the remainder of the evening free. Every volunteer that wasn’t already permanently working at the Apothiki was put on rotation to work selected full days at the Apothiki. Full Apothiki days started half an hour later than excavation, at 06:30. We would be picked up and driven to the Apothiki, wash pottery, break for Kollatzo at 11:00, rest between 14:30-16:30 until the afternoon shift of Apothiki workers began to arrive, and continued to wash pottery or to help organize the finds until work was done for the day.

Working hard and having fun! (© EBSA; photo by M. Georgiadou)

This season, Sissi was split into six dig areas, called zones. I was assigned to Zone 16: the Central Court. My Zone Supervisor and Toughbook Assistant were well versed in explaining and guiding new volunteers regarding excavation, explaining individual tasks and creating a wonderful daily working environment. The volunteers in my zone had diverse backgrounds, academically and in terms of excavation experience, which made for an exciting summer of getting to know one another. In my trench, the goal was to extend the Central Court to the south to discover the South Wall (if there was one left). Toward the end of the six-week dig season, my trench found the South Wall of the Central Court! Prior to discovering the southern end of the court, we discovered a western access point to the Central Court which was beautifully paved, and can be argued to be a processional walk way leading into the Central Court!

Washing pottery at the Apothiki (© EBSA; T. Thoennes)

Though there was a lot of worked involved, there was also plenty of time for fun. I was delighted that weekends were ours to do with as we pleased. I spent almost every weekend travelling around Crete to various other cities and archaeological sites with fellow volunteers, my newfound friends. We used the first weekend as a time to relax and give our bodies some rest after being thrown into physical labour and Greece’s extremely hot summer climate. On the second weekend, we went to Rethymnon and to a Minoan cemetery at Armeni (which had over 200 chamber tombs!). The third weekend we went to Knossos, traveled around Heraklion and Malia. The fourth weekend we went to Palaikastro and hiked up to the Peak Sanctuary of Petsofas. On the second-last weekend, a very close friend that I met from the USA and I went to Phaistos: we had contemplated if the long distance would be worth the trip for one day, and was it ever! The last weekend of the excavation, there was a beach party for everyone on the team as a farewell and close to a fantastic excavation season.  In addition to free time on weekends, having the evenings free meant there was time to have group dinners with fellow volunteers, time to go to the beach, and time for an awe-inspiring tour of the entire site of Sissi by its director, Professor J. Driessen.

At Petsofas Peak Sanctuary overlooking Palaikastro (© EBSA; E. Sevastakis)

I am often asked about how I found out about the excavation, how I got on it, and how much it cost. Like many people I did not know how to get onto an excavation: I also had no idea that someone without any archaeological background or previous experience would be accepted onto a dig site. It wasn’t until I met with a professor from one of my classes and asked very basic questions about how he had found his path in the academic world: it was him that suggested I try excavating, and it was him that put me in touch with the director of Sissi. Once I was in contact with Professor J. Driessen, we established I was available for the entire six-week excavation season and that I was able to (and expected to) fund my own way to Crete, and my stay during the unpaid excavation. Although funding my own way to and during the excavation proved to be rather expensive, booking my flights in advance and grocery shopping instead of eating out for every dinner brought the cost down significantly.  Lesson learned: go talk to your profs! They are wonderful people that are there to answer your questions, however basic they may seem!

Having the opportunity to live and work in a small town in Greece was a fun and eye-opening experience that had an immense impact on me. Dining at family run venues (my personal favourites were Remezzo, Paradosiako and Stam Stam!) created an atmosphere of intimacy and wholesomeness that left one feeling rejuvenated and one with Greek cultural traditions. The experiences I accumulated during excavation as well as on weekends exploring the Cretan environment re-established my passion for ancient history and has since helped direct my interest moving forward into graduate studies.

In the six-week excavation at Sissi, I grew a lot as an archaeologist and as a person. I found that I had pushed myself mentally and physically more than I had ever originally anticipated when I had left Toronto. The experience to work hands-on with history, being in the dirt trying to find quite literally the foundation of proto-historical societies, was an astounding feeling. Volunteering on this excavation introduced me to an aspect of history which I will continue to study, and hopefully, will continue to excavate.

Sissi Team photo taken on the Central Court (© EBSA; Gavin McGuire)

How do you explain and visualize opera and the performing arts to blind and partially sighted people while keeping true to historical forms?

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

L to R: OA Board Member Jan Lambert, Lauren, OA Co-Artistic Director Jeannette Lajeunesse Zingg @ a community workshop

Hello, I am Lauren Wu and I am currently a fourth-year student competing my art history major in the Department of Art. Throughout my university career I have always been fascinated with the spectacles and traditions of the preforming arts. Opera, dance and theater have been themes and ideas that I have explored in many classes including FAH353H1 (On Display: Cultures of Exhibition, 1789-1900) and FAH345H1 (The Romantic Movement in French Art).

Love of the arts has been cultivated and nurtured by my ballet teachers, Jeannette and Marshall. Opera Atelier is an Opera Company based in Toronto, with an emphasis on baroque period opera. Annually, they mount two different productions and take a travelling production to the Royal Opera House at Versailles. Not only an Opera Company, Opera Atelier has the Making of an Opera program for schools to introduce to opera to students through participation in activities such as staging, singing, and dancing.

Photo by Bruce Zinger

Two years ago my ballet teachers approached me with a question of making opera more accessible to a broader audience. With my background in government relations and advocacy I was motivated to find a solution and provide innovative programming that catered to blind and partially sighted people.

Throughout the course of this project, I have researched how certain institutions, particularly the Art Gallery of Ontario and Metropolitan Museum of Art have approached this question and apply their solutions to what would later be used at Opera Atelier. I have had the opportunity to create partnerships with various community agencies that cater to blind and partially sighted people. These relationships have helped us create unique programming for each group. Workshops can range from a single day workshop in a community or school setting, as part of the Making of an Opera program to a series of workshops for young professionals designed to engage a new generation of opera goers.

Art Gallery of Ontario, Multisensory tour – Lauren and Rodin’s The Thinker

Designing these workshops has also put my skills developed in art history to use. Opera Atelier produces baroque opera and therefore studies the history of baroque art and baroque performance. The skills of art history such as research and the study of objects is essential for their productions Motifs, found especially in classical sculpture for example, and can be a great way to teach positions of the body or help engage students in historically informed discussions. For our course happening in the winter, we have used Ulysses sculpture at Versailles as principal inspiration. Furthermore, other courses I have taken in anthropology and archaeology have also helped the creation of this project.

I encourage any student to explore their interests outside of the classroom. Taking an independent study or internship course can help you broaden the scope of your interests. Not only does it provide a motivating challenge to complete a real project in the world, it also provides a space to develop your own ideas and have them realized in the broader community. These opportunities should not be overlooked by any student interested in a career in the arts.

My Summer with Peggy – Reflections on an Internship at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Image from www.guggenheim.org

“Having plenty of time and the museum’s funds at my disposal, I put myself on a regime to buy one picture a day.”

– Peggy Guggenheim, 1947, on amassing her collection in Paris

 

I walked up the crooked stone steps to the small entrance vestibule and was greeted by a dapper young man in a suit. I extended my hand with forced confidence and introduced myself as one of the new interns. After an exchange of pleasantries, he grinned goofily and motioned to the faded terracotta palazzo to his right. Like countless guests before and after me I asked him where the bathroom was…

My name is Hella Wiedmer-Newman and from April to June 2017 I was an intern at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice. The PGC is one of Europe’s most beloved modern art museums, due to both Peggy Guggenheim’s biography and the unique works on display there. The museum was established in 1980; it had served as the collector’s private home from 1949 to 1979 when Guggenheim died after a career as one of the 20th century’s most important art collectors and patrons. Her friend Philip Rylands helped turn her former residence into a museum (the collection was bequeathed to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation under the condition that it remain in Venice). He served as director until June 2017 when Karole Vail, Peggy’s granddaughter and a curator at the Guggenheim in New York, took over.

The internship program employs 25 to 30 interns at a time for stays of one to three months. Interns change monthly; when there is a last-minute cancellation, others can apply to stay an extra month. As an intern, I got to perform all the jobs that make a museum tick: I guarded rooms, sold and cancelled tickets, distributed audio-guides, checked coats and staffed special events; cleaned windows, sculptures and benches; secured protective coverings for light-sensitive paintings and drawings, and replenished the gift shop. I also delivered at least five public talks a month on Guggenheim’s life, as well as individual artworks and movements represented in the collection and current exhibitions. During my internship, the exhibitions included the surrealist period of Rita Kerrn-Larsen and a retrospective of the works of the anti-abstract expressionist Mark Tobey. I also gave tours of the entire collection in English and German, remunerated with EUR 60 (unless it was for friends of the museum). At first, speaking in front of an audience of strangers can seem daunting and it takes a few tries to master: in my very first talk I got so flustered trying to explicate a painting of a nude woman riding a bicycle that I blurted out: “It’s like what Freud says about dreams and wish fulfillment; I mean, haven’t you ever had that dream where you’re naked in public, I know I have it all the time?!”

At the end of our respective stays, each of us had to deliver a 30-minute seminar. They didn’t have to take the form of a traditional academic paper, but were rather a way of introducing the other interns to something new, or a chance to explore something related to Venice. My seminar addressed the narrative and affective capabilities of Virtual Reality, a notable theme at this year’s Biennale.

Not all my time as an intern was work. E very month we had at least one lecture with a curator, conservator/restorer, or administrator, and a tour or lecture led by Dr. Rylands himself. We also took two trips as a group each month: a Venice trip to a local event, and a big trip beyond Venice. Highlights this summer were the Damien Hirst exhibition at the Punta della Dogana and the Palazzo Grassi, and Palladio’s Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza. At the beginning of every month there was a welcome breakfast and dinner for the new interns and at the end the Festa della Fine del Mese, a potluck on the museum’s famous roof-top terrace. We would also enjoy the odd spritz by the grand canal after work, and occasional house parties and group dinners were common. Many of us also visited other parts of Italy during our stay.

But, most importantly, celebrities often visit the museum. In my last month, I spotted Anne Hathaway walking around the Anthony Caro dressed entirely in white and sporting a blue baseball cap, and, as was the custom, I immediately alerted everyone to her whereabouts. We all piled into the special exhibition space and one of us started doing a pretend tour, which actually garnered a few interested nods from Anne herself – yeah, we’re on a first name basis now.

I am often asked about salary, admission and life in Venice. The salary is EUR 800/month, which just covers rent of one of the rooms on a list sent out to interns before their arrival, and basic food. It helps if you have some money saved. I found a room in the apartment of a lovely couple, but others were not so lucky and housing was a constant topic of discussion. The application is a straightforward online process requiring two recommendations, a résumé and a short essay on one’s interest in the collection. One can specify a desired length of time (one to three months) or specific months, though the final decision rests with the PGC. It is helpful if one speaks languages other than English, especially French, Italian or German. And finally, perseverance pays off: many interns are accepted only after a second or even third try.

Living in Venice is overwhelming, in the best possible way. Especially during the tourist season and, more importantly, the Biennale, the crowds were initially daunting. But, though it was annoying at times to walk through the streets already crowded at 7:30 am – not a day went by that I didn’t see a new bride with her entire wedding party scouring the Piazza San Marco for the perfect backdrop to her photos — there are many secluded areas and nice, cheap restaurants where tourists seldom venture. (One of my favourite bars is called Adriatico Mar; they serve artisanal rhubarb spritz, need I say more?!) I was also delighted by the vast number of art spaces in Venice, not just during the Biennale. Venice swells your soul and, in a tiny way, changes you forever.

Among other things — patience, for instance, and decorum and pragmatism — the internship taught me a new comfort with researching and crafting texts on a range of topics in a very short time, and presenting them to strangers. It was also a welcome challenge to work with so many people from different countries and, as a precious side effect, to form friendships with some. The PGC internship is a truly singular opportunity; it has enriched me in many different ways and left me feeling more fully sculpted than when I first ascended those crooked stone steps.

If you have any questions about the application process, the internship itself or Venice, please do not hesitate to contact me: hella.wiedmer.newman@mail.utoronto.ca

Here is a link to the 2018 internship application form: http://www.guggenheim-venice.it/inglese/education/pdf/internship-form.pdf

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